doughnut economics amsterdam

April 9, 2020. I believe this newly downscaled Doughnut tool has a great deal to offer and I look forward to seeing it turned into transformative action, in Amsterdam and far beyond. One thing is certain, though. Any investment or investment activity to which this communication relates is only available to relevant persons and will be engaged in only with relevant persons, or in the EEA, with Qualified Investors. Kate Raworth, a researcher at the Environmental Change Institute in Oxford, summarises the complexity of a momentous challenge in the shape of a doughnut. PERSON"), AUSTRALIA, CANADA, JAPAN OR SOUTH AFRICA OR ANY OTHER JURISDICTION WHERE SUCH AN OFFER OR SOLICITATION WOULD REQUIRE THE APPROVAL OF LOCAL AUTHORITIES OR OTHERWISE BE UNLAWFUL (THE "OTHER COUNTRIES"). WARNING: the above certification constitutes a "self-certification" pursuant to Decree of the President of the Italian Republic No. Find out more, Piazzale Enrico Mattei,1 We think the doughnut economy is the best way not only to help us to emerge from the crisis, but above all to rethink the future, The doughnut economic model is based on a question that, according to Kate Raworth, we can no longer take for granted: what does it really mean to grow? Today sees the launch of a new and holistic approach to downscaling the Doughnut, and we are confident that it has huge potential at multiple scales – from neighbourhood to nation – as a tool for transformative action. A few days ago Amsterdam announced that it would adopt the first ‘city doughnut’ model [] for circular economy; an adapted model from Kate Raworth’s doughnut economic model [].Check out this great video from the Auckland Writers Festival from 2019 where Raworth explains the need for a new economic model. False certifications are punishable by law. Confirmation of Understanding and Acceptance of Disclaimer. The centre hole represents the people who do not reach the minimum standards of income, education, healthcare, housing, food, and access to clean water and air. Amsterdam has already decided how and where it will start to get things moving again, as soon as the conditions allow. The information to which this website gives access is directed only at persons (i) who are persons falling within Article 49(2)(a) to (d) ("high net worth companies, unincorporated associations etc.") For further information please refer to our cookie policy. Not even the traditionally highly organised Netherlands knows where this is going. It is important to look closely at where we are starting from – and realise that the problems are interconnected. These materials are for informational purposes only and are not directed to, nor are they intended for, access by persons located or resident in the United States, Australia, Canada, Japan or South Africa or any of the Other Countries. Our work is based on passion and innovation, on our unique strengths and skills, on the equal dignity of each person, recognizing diversity as a key value for human development, on the responsibility, integrity and transparency of our actions. While it’s been a useful model for thinking about the balance between social needs and environmental boundaries, it’s largely been a theoretical tool. "Be agnostic about growth," reads one of the "Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist" –the subtitle of Doughnut Economics. By Kate Raworth, originally published by Doughnut Economics. With this plan, Amsterdam appears to be the first city in the world to turn to something called “doughnut economics,” an economic framework created by … Amsterdam in Holland was recently confirmed as the first ‘Doughnut City’, using the model to underpin its economic development strategy. The likelihood of this happening in Amsterdam is high, thanks to the newly launched Amsterdam Donut Coalition: a network of over 30 organisations – including community groups, commons-based organisations, SMEs, businesses, academia and local government – that are already putting Doughnut Economics into practice in their work. Moving To A Circular Economy “[A] circular economy has been one of the city’s priorities for several years now. In practice, it is important not to cross this boundary if we are to avoid damaging the climate, the oceans, biodiversity and therefore the Earth as a whole. Amsterdam and the doughnut-economy The city of Amsterdam works together with Kate Raworth to develop a doughnut model for the city. Other cities are thinking about it, too. Economist Kate Raworth has adapted her doughnut model for Amsterdam. But she added an important note: "The doughnut doesn't provide answers, but it does help us to find them." The Amsterdam City Doughnut has been developed in collaboration between Doughnut Economics Action Lab (DEAL), Circle Economy, Biomimicry 3.8 and C40 over the course of one year. Today is the launch of the Amsterdam City Doughnut, which takes the global concept of the Doughnut and turns it into a tool for transformative action in the city of Amsterdam. The data collected, for example, show that almost 20% of those living in cities struggle to combine basic needs with excessively high rental costs. The outer crust marks the limit, established based on a large amount of studies and research, beyond which we end up consuming in excess of what we actually have available. A light-hearted way of referring to what is a very serious economic model, which the British press has described as "a revolutionary alternative to the growth paradigm". Now it seems more important than ever. It is a holistic snapshot of Amsterdam will become the first city in the world to adopt the “doughnut” economic model thought up by Kate Raworth, the British Economist from Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute. About this Event This one hour online event will take you through Kate Raworth’s model of Doughnut Economics and how the model is being applied to improve social and environmental justice in the city of Cambridge. Our newly created team at DEAL is currently focused on setting up this platform, so please be a little patient, and by the end of May we will get in touch with our plans for taking this downscaling work forward. Last year, long before the pandemic took hold, the city invited the English economist to become a lecturer at the local Applied Sciences University and to set up a network that, together with the local authorities, would include various associations, bodies and companies. In the strategy we use the Amsterdam City Doughnut (PDF, 3,4 MB) of the British economist Kate Raworth. The Amsterdam City Doughnut: a tool for transformative action, Seeking graphic designers for Doughnut Economics…, COVID-19, healthcare and the environment (the long read) | Environmental Physiotherapy Asscociation, Amsterdam embraces Doughnut Economics - by Kate Raworth - Wellbeing Economy Alliance, How Cities Balance COVID-19 Precautions with Economic Preservation - Harvard TECH City Innovators, Donut-ModellAmsterdam will sich grundlegend transformieren, Coping with Covid19 - Mutual Aid and Local Responses in a time of Coronavirus | Agricultural and Rural Convention Coping with Covid19 - Mutual Aid and Local Responses, A new economy requires bold action - Treemendo, Doughnut Economics Cyprus | Keithpp's Blog, Emerging from the Emergency – Transition Highgate, UK Newsletter 14: No Going Back – SoftMachine.net, UK Newsletter 14: No Going Back - Extinction Rebellion, Een gezonde economie support mensen én aarde (en niet andersom) - suzanneekel.nl. If you are interested in applying this tool for downscaling the Doughnut to your own place – your neighbourhood, village, town, city, region, nation – please do let us know by filling in this short form. Only our economic model is based on the idea that global GDP should continue to rise forever, whilst resources remain limited.". The Amsterdam Donut Coalition, founding meeting, December 2019. Her findings resulted in a bestselling book called Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist. Furthermore, human beings must play a key role in designing a "wiser system" that is flexible and not based solely on economic theories that have been developed almost arbitrarily. It would not be the "happy degrowth" or even the return to the past that other economists talk about but rather something else, namely "the search for a system that offers a good life for all within planetary boundaries." Working together they are becoming a catalyst for transformative change, generating inspiration and action within Amsterdam and far beyond. Doughnut Economics is rapidly moving from the fringe to the mainstream. The approach could help the municipality with its post-pandemic recovery. Amsterdam is a great place for launching this tool because this city has already placed the Doughnut at the heart of its long-term vision and policymaking, and is home to the Amsterdam Donut Coalition, a network of inspiring change-makers who are already putting the Doughnut into practice in their city. The City of Amsterdam has launched its Circular 2020-2025 strategy, which outlines the actions to halve the use of new raw materials by 2030. Everyone is likewise welcome to leave responses and suggestions about Amsterdam’s City Doughnut, and the City Doughnut tool, below in the Comments section of this blog. Last year, long before the pandemic took hold, the city invited the English economist to become a lecturer at the local Applied Sciences University and to set up a network that, together with the local authorities, would include various associations, bodies and companies. This also gives rise to a number of other points, including the need to "design to redistribute", since it would be incorrect to say that the market in itself will create equality in the long run; "create to regenerate", abandoning the idea of disposable consumption forever; and last but not least to "tell a new story," because the narrative of continuous growth and of the market guiding our choices, having played a dominant role throughout the 20th century, apparently presents too many issues that are now coming to a head. There –in addition to thousands of deaths– the virus continues to weigh heavy on the economy, keep tourists away and inflame the electoral campaign already under way for the spring 2021 elections. Amsterdam is the first city in the world to officially adopt Doughnut economics. Ever since then people have asked: can we downscale the Doughnut so that we can apply it here – in our town, our country, our region? Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. This being the case, it does not offer a series of recipes to be followed but rather a perspective that broadens the angle from which problems are tackled. How can humanity also learn to create settlements big and small that promote the wellbeing of their inhabitants, while respecting the wider living communities in which they are embedded? The Doughnut, or Doughnut economics, is a visual framework for sustainable development – shaped like a doughnut or lifebelt – combining the concept of planetary boundaries with the complementary concept of social boundaries. Workshops for city officials and community representatives in Philadelphia, Portland and Amsterdam, 2019. 00144 Rome, Italy, Via Emilia, 1 This had two main outcomes: a new and detailed portrait of the city and a Roadmap 2020-2025 approved by the City Council, which announced the revolution at the end of June. How many poor citizens does a city have, or how many living in more polluted neighbourhoods, or areas where schools, houses or green areas are sub-standard? After the crisis the change that brings the circle to a close. As Raworth points out: "We must deal with jobs and health, the economy and the environment at the same time and in the same way". According to Raworth, post-Covid Amsterdam is only the first step: "We would never have imagined that we would be launching the project in the midst of such a great crisis, but perhaps the need for change has presented us with an even greater opportunity." Working together they are becoming a catalyst for transformative change, generating inspiration and action within Amsterdam … Amsterdam’s doughnut Amsterdam is the first city in the world to officially adopt Doughnut economics. "We think this is the best way not only to help us emerge from the crisis, but above all to rethink the future," explains Deputy Mayor of Amsterdam Marieke Van Doorninck. Their aims include reducing waste to a minimum and encouraging the recycling of furniture, clothes and electronics by increasing the number of ‘libraries of things’, second-hand markets and centres teaching the skills required to repair items. Building more would solve part of the problem, of course, but it would also cause further damage to another delicate system –the environment. Products and solutions for business and customers Italy and abroad, The platform dedicated to Eni's current and future suppliers. By introducing Doughnut-thinking into policymaking, coupled with the self-organising and dynamic uptake of the Doughnut by the city’s civil society through the Amsterdam Doughnut Coalition, Amsterdam has provided an inspirational and pioneering starting point for turning Doughnut Economics into 21st century transformative action. And that is where the secret lies: asking oneself, for every potential action, how the overall design would change and what impact it would have not only on the particular problem at hand but overall. Doughnut Economics: Amsterdam Amsterdam has adopted a doughnut economics approach in its Amsterdam Circular 2020-2025 Strategy, so that Amsterdam can be a “thriving and equitable city” that ensures “a good life for everyone within the Earth’s natural boundaries.” 1 What is doughnut economics? working very closely with fantastic colleagues at Biomimicry 3.8, Circle Economy and C40 Cities, all collaborating as part of the Thriving Cities Initiative, funded by the KR Foundation. of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Financial Promotion) Order 2005 (the "Order") or (ii) who have professional experience in matters relating to investments falling within Article 19(5) of the Order or (iii) to whom it may otherwise lawfully be communicated (all such persons together being referred to as "relevant persons"). “The Amsterdam Doughnut: A Tool for Transformative Action,” by the Doughnut Economics Action Lab (2020). While straining to keep citizens safe in the Dutch capital, municipality officials and the British economist Kate Raworth from Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute have also been plotting how the city will rebuild in a post-Covid-19 world. PERSON UNLESS THE SECURITIES ARE REGISTERED UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT, OR AN EXEMPTION FROM THE REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS OF THE SECURITIES ACT IS AVAILABLE. April 8 was the launch of the Amsterdam City Doughnut, which takes the global concept of the Doughnut and turns it into a tool for transformative action in the city of Amsterdam. And here’s what we think is the real opportunity. Working together they are becoming a catalyst for transformative change, generating inspiration and action within Amsterdam … The answer lies in that basic sketch.

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